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The Age Thing


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#46 emz

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Posted 25 August 2009 - 06:31 AM

Actually, Stephenie Meyer's writing isn't very good. Her WORK, on the other hand, is absolutely addicting, but if you notice,
she overuses adjectives in one entence. She repeats words, and has plenty of grammar mistakes. Don't get me wrong,
I'm a HUGE Twihard. In fact, half of my room is filled with Twilight merchandise and I even skipped school one time
to go to a Hot Topic event for the Lost Concert. But let's face it, her writing is not her forte. It's her passion. Look at
the last book--did you notice how choppy the sentences were?

Don't get offended and defensive about it. You can still love books that aren't exactly literary works, which means you
love the characters or plot.

AND, it can be the editors' fault the writing is weak, because they let it get published in what could be assumed to be a
lazy moment instead of getting back to it and working and working on it. Still, no matter what, I'll still be a fan. You just
have to have a sense of reality, you know? How can you write when you don't see the truth?

About getting published as a teenager, you don't put your age in your query, so how can they know?
QUESTION: Are literary agents allowed to reject you simply because if your age? Even if they probably already
said they want to represent you?



I know publishers can. I wrote that I was under 18 on a picture book submission, and they said they liked it (this was probably a lie lol) and that because I am under 18 they can't take it.
Dunno bout Agents
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#47 kiya12309

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 11:54 PM

Mia wrote Ransom My Heart with steamy scenes, without even experiencing them.


Mia's not Mia though... she's Meg Cabot.
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#48 IlovePavlov13

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Posted 10 October 2009 - 12:09 PM

Mia's not Mia though... she's Meg Cabot.



Oh sorry! I was just making a point!
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#49 jess_rob4ever

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Posted 24 October 2009 - 12:06 PM

Mia's not Mia though... she's Meg Cabot.


Well, actually, authors have to understand their character's perspective and everything. She's even said, "THen I wrote Ransom My Heart the way I thought Mia would." And I doubt Mia would write something like Queen of Babble.
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#50 xoxo Titanic xoxo

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 07:11 PM

I agree with Kati.
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#51 xoxo Titanic xoxo

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Posted 30 October 2009 - 07:16 PM

I'm fourteen and i have had three of my short stories publishes in literary magizines. She needs to shut the hell up. Most of us have expirenced our first kiss.

that is what themorninglight said.
What short stories have you written? Did you go to a writing school or just went to an editor? CONGRATS on being published. I'm about to. But I'm just wondering all the questions I just asked. Just wondering. Again, congrates.


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#52 MusicLover11

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Posted 28 December 2009 - 10:54 PM

I like to write romances, and even though *sadly* I've never been kissed (well, except for once... but it wasn't even on the lips) because I'm writing a romance, I normally have the main characters kiss. I read a lot, and I can imagine, so it normally sounds like a really bad cliche :) hopefully by the time I send anything into an agent or publisher, I'll have been kissed and will be able to 'write what I know'. So yeah, I think 'with age comes experience', and all that, but just because you're young doesn't mean you suck.
Sarah x
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#53 awkwardchica

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Posted 23 January 2010 - 06:00 AM

I actually agree with this blog. When I was sixteen I truly thought my writing was good, and it was. For a sixteen-year-old. Now that I'm eighteen with a little more experience, a little harsher criticism, and a whole different life as an independent adult, my writing has taken on a different sort of quality. And when I'm twenty, the same shall be true. And when I'm forty, again, the same.

I think that many teenagers aren't fantastic writers (besides the inexperience of life thing) because their writing hasn't found a certain voice yet. Don't get me wrong- many have- but not //that// many. I think we adapt our writing to fit the books we admire. For instance, when I was fifteen and sixteen, I really did like Meg Cabot's writing a lot. She has personality. I still do like her style, but I don't particularly like the plots anymore, I guess. Anyways, my style of writing was sort of a copy of hers. She still influences it, but I have a more my own style now.

However, I agree that age is not parallel with talent or quality. I've read some darn good stories (or chapters, I suppose. I'm not good at following stories) on this website, but how many of those $7 paperbacks at Borders absolutely SUCK? But hey, they still got published, you know? It's very interesting.
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#54 StrawberryPrincess

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 04:58 AM

I guess it has a lot to do with how long you have written. If a fifteen year old writes her first novel it won´t be good. If it is her fifth already, it might be brilliant. It´s the same for a forty year old.
German author Jenny-Mai Nuyen was eighteen when she published her first novel and I think she is brilliant. She has written her first novel at age 13 (it didn´t get published of course)and I bet she has written quite some since then. She can compete with adult fantasy writers anytime.

Another aspect is surely what and how much you are reading. How should someone who has only read the Twilight books be able to write a great thriller? I think you can´t really write without reading a lot. You need to get to know different styles and voices before you can find your own.

The expierience thing...well, I do not really believe in it. I mean, I wrote kissing scenes when I had never been kissed and people who had been kissed told me they were good. It´s not so much about experience but imagination.
Somone said, you can´t describe what a college dorm smells like and what sounds you hear at night if you have never seen one. I´m not really sure that is true. I think a lot of people could pull it off. And I don´t think the "Fantasy is different"-argument really works here. It´s just as hard writing about holding a vampire´s hand as writing a kissing scene without having been kissed. I mean, how would historical fiction work if it was different?

Love,

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#55 Cockatoo

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Posted 20 June 2011 - 08:15 AM

I'm currently 11 years old. Yeah.
I know my stories aren't good. I mean, what 11 year olds story is good?
But I still think - if I read enough of them - I would be able to produce an allright kissing scene.

And I don't write because I want to become an author. I just write because I like to. It's fun.

-Amelia
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#56 bubba97

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Posted 21 June 2011 - 04:09 AM

Okay, I read it, but I don't think she was that harsh..

Here's what she really said:

I recently read about a young writer who had published her first novel (a teen romance) and she said she had never even been kissed! How can you write about boys if you don’t know what they are like? If you have never even had a boyfriend? I was quite appalled. I don’t want to read a romance from someone who has never experienced love. Puh-leeze.

So, get out there. Kiss tons of boys. Fight with your girlfriends. Go to a lot of parties. Spend too much money. Have FUN. Fall in love. Fall out of love. Make mistakes. Wear platform shoes and trip on them.



I think she was just being real.



And about Stephenie Meyer, the editor probably didn't edit it better because that would've killed the life out of the story, it would've taken away the spontaneity.

The sentences may not be perfect, but what is perfect anyway?


I find it awefully boring to read an inpecable book.

Mistakes, flaws, they add to the charm.


Perfection is boring. And when a writer wrote that sentence soo full of mistakes, soo full of repition and grammar errors, that writer was feeling something.

And that's the emotion he wants you to feel when you read his book.

You don't write a sentence until you find just the perfect way to express what you're feeling.

You don't write a paragraph for it to be perfect.

You write so that people would enjoy reading it as much as you enjoyed writing it.


And I've had someone correct a paragraph of mine, and it didn't sound like I had written it. It sounded like it was made by a computer, it didn't have a touch of personality, it could've been written by anybody.


And I don't agree that teenage writers don't have a big vocabulary.

My first language is French, my second one is Arabic and then there's English, and you'd be surprised how wide my vocabulary is, for a french girl.

It's not 'cause we're teenagers that we don't know.

I mean, we're not toddlers, we've been kissed, we've acted crazy, we've worn high heels and we've made many mistakes.

We know somethings most adults don't.

We know how to be happy, without putting that much effort into it.


And that shows, when I read many teenage stories.


And let's face it, the world has changed soo much that the stuff you used to do when you were 16, half the 14 year olds are already doing that.



I just think, teenage writing is more free. Happier.

More spontanuous.


Because at our age, we don't know what's comming next, and we don't want to.

At our age, it's not about perfection, it's about pleasure.

Happiness.


But that's just what I think :)


-Alexandra
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#57 Ohliveeah

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 03:35 PM

To be completely honest, I don't think I want to be published or well known until I'm an adult. I have been told by teachers, friends, etc; that I am a good writer and that when I publish a book they will buy it. I want to have more experiences, give more emotion, meaning and passion in my books than what I can when I'm sixteen. Knowing the amount I have improved in the past year makes me excited for what I will be capable when I am twenty five. When I look back on the first novel I publish, I want it to be as satisfied with it as I am with the one I am currently writing. And, I know that, that novel isn't going to be the one I'm working on right now.

Furthermore, I would rather be judged by my writing rather than my age. "Her book is amazing...for her age" isn't really the same as "Her book is really amazing!"
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#58 Anshi

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Posted 27 June 2011 - 01:31 AM

I think all she wanted to say was get some experience and live you life before you write about it.
No matter how much you'd like to deny it some of the things ARE based on personal experience

Like in my case I don't live in U.S.A , I have never been kissed also well yeah I've never slapped a guy or said " Touch me one more time and I'll castrate you "

so sometimes I do come of as an amature and I know that but I do try to conceal it by research and observation.

and as for Stephenie Meyers I kinda didn't like Edward or Bella they were both too boring and in Bella's case selfish also ( remember her and Jacob ) well yeah don't hate me or go "HOW CAN YOU HATE EDWARD HE'S PURRFECT"

In reality anyone had a boyfriend like him it would be too suffocating and creepy he lied to her so many times about so many thigs she SHOULD have known( Victoria,jacob listening to them in Eclipse)

Jacob on the other hand is my favourite.
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#59 24moon100

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 02:57 AM

I think we progress the older we get. :) Simple as that.


-MEG
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#60 24moon100

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 03:11 AM

Also, I think it only makes sense that most Authors are older. They have learned more, experienced more, and seen more. Teen writing is only the start of a wonderful journey. Maybe you wont publish that worldwide bestseller right now, but just wait, you WILL. Everything you write and continue to write counts. Its the stepping stones on your path. You have to take them in order to reach your destination. Think about it like this: you can only get better from here right? So why dwell on your age? In time you'll have that wonderful story you've always wanted to write. Maybe sooner, maybe later. And, who knows? Anythings possible.

You just have to believe first.


-MEGHAN

Edited by 24moon100, 26 July 2011 - 03:12 AM.

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#61 24moon100

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 03:43 AM

And to ADD to that...Haha. Whats the deal with this talk about kissing scenes? I mean really. Why should it matter if you kissed someone or not? I highly doubt it plays a factor in the writing part of it all that much. Besides, you can learn how to write a good kissing scene NOT by actually kissing but by observing. I know that sounds funny but I think it helps more. Think about it: if your DESCRIBING a kiss in text form, then it only seems logical to see what it looks like. Watch romance movies/tv shows. Go out to a public place and see in it action. Read multiple kissing scenes from stories and see how OTHER writers describe kissing. I see how some may think you have to experience it yourself to really be able to capture the FEELING of it. But some of us aren't as lucky in the dating department. I say: If you want to write a kissing scene-follow my advice.

Observe.


-MEG
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#62 24moon100

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 04:24 AM

In addition to THAT....(This is becoming a full out rant) I think that a writer is only as good as their imagination. Whats the point of a story idea if you can't mentally visualize it? I think writing doesn't have to be all about experience and skill. It helps to HAVE experience and skill. But if you truly want to write something its all up to how you interpret and visualize it in your heart and mind-How you dream of it at night or daydream of it during the day. Most of us wont be able to travel the globe and experience the world or what ever else there is to experience. Some of us aren't as lucky and will possibly never experience what we wish to write about. But you can still research and observe. No to forget, you will always always have your imagination. So don't think you HAVE to experience what you write. Maybe it is easier to stick with things and places you are familiar with, but don't hinge on that. Its okay to take risks and experiment. I think its heathy to explore foreign territory. Even if it isn't what you end up writing about, it still helps to have a wider expanse and variety on writing. If you only subject yourself to romances, how will you every know if your good at writing something like fantasy? I'm just saying, I think we write about what we WANT to write. It should be about age, or skills, or experience, or reality or even what others think. Its just about you and what you want to write. Whether people choose to except thats what writings truly all about, its up to them. :)


Though I must say, you should also just HAVE FUN. It shouldn't be a job or a chore, (I'm big on that) it should be a passion. Enjoy your writing. When you write it, when you imagine it, when you read it over, HAVE FUN. No matter how old you are, If you honestly ENJOY it, then I guarantee someone else out there is going to enjoy reading it. :heartbeat:


PEACE OUT!


-MEG
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#63 24moon100

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 04:30 AM

It should be about age, or skills, or experience, or reality or even what others think. Its just about you and what you want to write.


Oppsies. :) I meant to say shouldn't***

MEGGIN
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#64 Jcrazy

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 09:57 AM

And to ADD to that...Haha. Whats the deal with this talk about kissing scenes? I mean really. Why should it matter if you kissed someone or not? I highly doubt it plays a factor in the writing part of it all that much. Besides, you can learn how to write a good kissing scene NOT by actually kissing but by observing. I know that sounds funny but I think it helps more. Think about it: if your DESCRIBING a kiss in text form, then it only seems logical to see what it looks like. Watch romance movies/tv shows. Go out to a public place and see in it action. Read multiple kissing scenes from stories and see how OTHER writers describe kissing. I see how some may think you have to experience it yourself to really be able to capture the FEELING of it. But some of us aren't as lucky in the dating department. I say: If you want to write a kissing scene-follow my advice.

Observe.


-MEG


Haha I agree, but still. It sounds stalkerish :P lol.
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#65 24moon100

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 06:37 PM

Haha I agree, but still. It sounds stalkerish :P lol.


Haha. I respect stalkers then. :D

:love7:

-MEG
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#66 BonkersBookworm78

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 07:50 AM

Judging someone's writing by their age is one thing, judging someone's writing by their experience or state of mind is another. Its not about how old you are, it's about how much you write, as well as how much you've read. Age is totally irrelevant. My friends don't understand what I am on about and I have the reading age of somebody four years older than I am. If you love writing enough and read as much as you can, you have experienced more than most adults. It's not about how old you are on the outside, it's about how mature you are as an individual.

Millie May
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#67 BonkersBookworm78

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 07:53 AM

I meant you read, not

you've read]


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#68 Meg_Rulz

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:33 PM

Judging someone's writing by their age is one thing, judging someone's writing by their experience or state of mind is another. Its not about how old you are, it's about how much you write, as well as how much you've read. Age is totally irrelevant. My friends don't understand what I am on about and I have the reading age of somebody four years older than I am. If you love writing enough and read as much as you can, you have experienced more than most adults. It's not about how old you are on the outside, it's about how mature you are as an individual.

Millie May


Totally!
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#69 dbcWinter

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 04:55 PM

It comes down to how well you can imagine things, how convincing you can be with words. Besides, even if you have never experienced something - first kiss, etc, - there are HUNDREDS of books that have written about the subject and you can learn from other authors how they described it and try to do something similar. And not to mention, TV helps.

Age is JUST a number. Some people excel at things at a very early age, some slightly later, some late in life, majority of people never does. We have people who win Olympics at 16, 18, we have peopel taht win at 34, 35, oin the same sports. Every human is an individual, defined only by themselves, not by their age. This is the magic of humanity - we are all different and cannot be generalized.


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