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#1 jess_rob4ever

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 11:57 PM

Alright, so there's this whole controversy about inexperienced teenagers writing novels at such a young age.

What are your views on this?

Because on Melissa de la Cruz's website, she says she doesn't want to read a romance novel written by a girl
who'd never even been kiss, and was horrified at the fact. But since novels are a work of fiction, isn't our
work based on the way WE and our characters view things rather than on reality?

If you go read dozens of YA romance comedies or dramas, aren't all romances a bit different?
Or do you think it's wrong that we're writing out the inner workings of our imaginations when most of us are
still inexperienced?
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#2 crazee_top

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 12:24 AM

Lets define the word Fiction: literary work based on the imagination and not necessarily on fact.

Now Imagination: the formation of a mental image of something that is not perceived as real and is not present to the senses; "popular imagination created a world ...

Its not age but imagination that defines a good author.

So I think sometimes teens are the best writers because we have such weird imaginations...

And we need to start some where. I think Melissa de la Cruz was being quite rude. i've read stories by people in this age and I couldnt believe that someone my age has written it.

Age shouldn't matter at all. Like you said every book is different. Every person is different. Many famous writers started as children.

This is quite interesting though...
Buh Bye
Jamie xx
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#3 StrawberryPrincess

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 05:29 AM

Because on Melissa de la Cruz's website, she says she doesn't want to read a romance novel written by a girl
who'd never even been kiss, and was horrified at the fact.


How rude...well, she´s missing out on some good books.
It´s kinda like saying you shouldn´t write vampire novels just because no one´s ever met one. I mean, it´s imagination and good writing that make a good author...not age or experience.

Love,

Kati :cat:
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#4 Princess_Missy

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 07:32 AM

I agree with Jamie. Age shouldn't matter.

I once read a book that was by a fourteen year old and I don't think some adults could have written it. I think it was called The Prophecy Of The Stones or something like that. It was really good.

So I don't think, as Jamie said, that just because you're a teenager means you aren't as good as some adult writers. True, they've had more experience in life, but that doesn't mean that they write better.

I think our writing can improve a lot over time (but so can everyones!) and that we'd probably be a better writer when we are a little older, but maybe that's because we've been writing for a while.

Love Melissa :heartbeat:
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#5 w/peaches

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 07:59 AM

I love Melissa de la Cruz's books, but I am really disappointed in her for saying that! Age does NOT mean a thing when it comes to writing, and I think we all know that (seeing as we are teen writers). I agree with what everyone else has said - experience does not define imagination. I am really, really disgusted with her for saying that. I mean, really!

I've read some books by adults that sucked. And books by teenagers that were amazing. So really, age doesn't have anything to do with it, and I hate it when people try to say or imply that it does. Why does it matter if you're 15 or 30 or 50? Some people are just good at writing, no matter your age.

I cannot emphasize it enough! Age doesn't matter!

~A~ :user:

P.S. Can you tell I'm passionate about this? ;)

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#6 ~booknerd~

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 01:07 PM

To play devil's advocate here, I think Melissa de la Cruz's comment wasn't based on age so much as on experience. How can you write realistically about something if you have no idea what it's like? For example, as she said, how can a girl who hasn't been kissed yet know what it's like?

That being said, I agree with you guys. I think you don't always have to experience something to know what it's like. For instance, I have not had a kiss yet, but I think I could write a kissing scene moderately well. Would it be really original? Probably not. But I have enough secondhand experience from reading other people's kissing scenes that I could do it.

Emily :icon_flower:

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#7 StrawberryPrincess

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 01:21 PM

I think it was called The Prophecy Of The Stones or something like that. It was really good.


Flavia Bujor was twelve when she wrote it and thirteen when it was published. :lol: I love this book. ^_^


Love,

Kati :cat:
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#8 spell_balognax3

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 02:11 PM

I know where this Cruella de Ville person is coming from. But I think she's assuming that because you have no experience with romance, it means you write crappy romance.

However, what about the people that write about drugs? Isn't she saying, "YOU HAVE TO TRY DRUGS BEFORE YOU CAN WRITE ABOUT IT!" or "YOU HAVE TO SHOOT YOURSELF WITH A GUN BEFORE YOU CAN TALK ABOUT SUICIDE."

I do agree, though, that romance is harder to write when you have no experience with it. But that's not stopping me.

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#9 w/peaches

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 02:29 PM

I totally agree, Shakey. Many people write a lot about topics they've never 'experienced'. Take fantasy writers, for example! Do you think fantasy writers have ever bumped into any of the creatures they write about? Probably not. But I have to agree that romance is different. Still, if someone who has skills in writing, and who is determined enough to try very hard, they could write a very good romance without having ever been kissed.

~A~ :user:

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#10 IluvWill22

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 05:06 PM

I agree, that is very rude. Stuffy old people!
We are the best writers in myopinion. We haven't lost our minds, we still have imaginations, and we still have all the time in the world to have fun with our writing!
I'm writing a novel, and I'm pretty sure no one will notice my book aftr it gets published. But I'm sure after a few years of writing, people will pick up my first book and realise that I'm an okay writer. But, once again, it's my first book, sooo...........

Isn't that funny that I'm writing my biggest project as my first book? I mean, this book is my life! It's my first series, and it will be my most important series! I only have two other books on mind and on hold.

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#11 the_tall_girl

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 06:56 PM

I kind of see her viewpoint, though. While there are many good teenage writers, most aren't. I know everyone likes to think they're good and everything. But a teenage girl really hasn't had experience in much. I mean I do agree that it's all about imagination and that age shouldn't be a factor. But you're a teenager. That's bound to come across in your writing. It's not a bad thing. But I can see why older people, adults, wouldn't want to read it. Adults want something adult-like and teenagers want something meant for their age. I wouldn't ever expect an adult to like my work. You gotta see it from their view point. They've already had their first kiss, finished high school/college and experienced a lot more things. It wouldn't be interesting for them to read. It'd be flat out boring. Not to mention that a lot of teenagers can't write nearly as well as experienced published authors.

You guys shouldn't take it personally. (: It's just a matter of preference.
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#12 IluvWill22

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 10:21 PM

Actually, there's a first grader that wrote and published his own book! And many people thought Stephenie Meyer was so young that her work wouldn't be good enough. Boy, were they surprised. So, basically it's just based on how you write it. And what you write.

Work hard, and read a lot, 'kay?
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#13 IlovePavlov13

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Posted 04 April 2009 - 10:55 PM

I'm writing about a 21-year-old girl and I'm 13, so most people would be like, "YOU CAN'T DO THAT, YOU DON'T KNOW COLLEGE, LET ALONE SPELL IT!" But, the_tall_girl, most writers start off as inexperienced people and as they write more, they know the whole tricks and stuff. But, its called research and Mia wrote Ransom My Heart with steamy scenes, without even experiencing them.
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#14 jess_rob4ever

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 01:21 AM

Exactly. What I think is that we should write about how we think things SHOULD be as well
as how they are.

Imagination is key: without it how can we describe a kiss (or something) instead of simply writing
"I was very nervous, but then we kissed." Imagination could make that sentence a billion times bettter.

Because, if you think about it, experience only shows you the way things are instead of bringing a flood
of descriptions along with it.
For example, this whole this kiss thing is just, We kissed, our mouths touched, but IMAGINATION (I alway imagine
Spongebob clapping his hand and a rainbow coming out) takes it a step forward so we can visualize
something else in similies and metaphors. Example: "I felt my heart pound as hard as if I'd just completed running
a three mile marathon."

Still, it's sad that people will still judge things according to your age.
Just like someone said about Stephenie Meyer and her writing, people younger than her can write better.
Same with the drugs thing and Mia with Ransom My Heart.
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#15 BlackBerry321

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 07:38 AM

I have to say that I actually agree with Julia.

And here's what a teenager who has met many published authors and has had her writing looked at and critiqued has to say on the matter:

Write all you want, don't expect to get it published anytime soon.

Sure, you might have a pretty cool idea and a decent novel, but the publishing industry isn't about DECENT stuff. It's about mother*#&$%%ing amazing stuff. Those people like Stephenie Meyer who managed to get their crappy writing on the bookshelves either got really lucky or had pretty stupid publishers/editors (I'm guessing it's the latter after reading Breaking Dawn.)

Unless you're some writing prodigy child, you won't have the required knowledge to write a good book. You won't have a varied enough vocabulary to write a good book. Writing is a skill that takes years and years to master and perfect. And yes, fiction is based on your imagination but you put a whole lot more of your experiences in your stories than you think.

So what I say is, don't stop writing - just don't expect it to be good. It will be one day, just not today.

Oh and for God's sake, listen to your English teachers. They know a whole hell lot more than you think.

Peace out.
Penny

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#16 ~booknerd~

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 11:18 AM

I agree with Julia as well. I know I said in my previous post that you don't have to have an experience to be able to write about something, and I still agree with that. But just because you've done your research about college doesn't mean that you can describe the exact smell of the dorm hallways. Or what kind of noises you hear at two in the morning.

She's also right about there only being a few really really good teenage writers. I mean, I'm looking at everyone's grammar and unrealistic expectations (no offense to anyone), and wondering how you really think you could be published in the next year or so. Don't get me wrong, you could if you truly worked your butt off at it. But the publishing industry is CRAZY. So many ADULTS don't get published. What makes you think you're so much better than all of them?

And look at it this way. When you look at something you wrote a year or more ago, don't tell me you don't cringe inside. I'd think you're either a liar or you haven't written much since then. It's just the way the world works. You learn through practice. And teenagers obviously haven't had as much practice as an adult.

I'm not trying to be anti-teenage writing here. Sure, teenagers and even younger kids can get published. It's just not common. I just think that, in general, adults are better because they've had more time to hone their skill.

Emily :icon_flower:

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#17 IluvWill22

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 02:54 PM

I have to say that I actually agree with Julia.

And here's what a teenager who has met many published authors and has had her writing looked at and critiqued has to say on the matter:

Write all you want, don't expect to get it published anytime soon.

Sure, you might have a pretty cool idea and a decent novel, but the publishing industry isn't about DECENT stuff. It's about mother*#&$%%ing amazing stuff. Those people like Stephenie Meyer who managed to get their crappy writing on the bookshelves either got really lucky or had pretty stupid publishers/editors (I'm guessing it's the latter after reading Breaking Dawn.)

Unless you're some writing prodigy child, you won't have the required knowledge to write a good book. You won't have a varied enough vocabulary to write a good book. Writing is a skill that takes years and years to master and perfect. And yes, fiction is based on your imagination but you put a whole lot more of your experiences in your stories than you think.

So what I say is, don't stop writing - just don't expect it to be good. It will be one day, just not today.

Oh and for God's sake, listen to your English teachers. They know a whole hell lot more than you think.

Peace out.
Penny

*Shocked* You, know, I didn't really care for the last two books either, but do you have to.....even some of Meg's early work wasn't written very well. Stephenie's work was great!
What I'm saying is, how well do first time writers write? I've read a lot of authors first novels and thought they were CR@P. But when I looked back after reading their latest novels, I think they've really improved.
No author wants to hear this, but the first novel is ALWAYS the worst. Because they're written too quickly and excitedly, so none of the description and feel of what the character feels is on the page.
I'm a first time writer, and the first novel I wrote SU(KED! I mean, Writing like this for hours and hours and hours and long long hours.
I mean that writing this way is really anoying to the reader, so it just makes them put the book down and never pick it up ever again, ever.
You see?^
It used to be half page sentances. I really got tired, and embarrassed, when I reread my first novel. So Stephenie Meyer and Meg Cabot are pretty f^&%$* AMAZING! And I don't want to hear that their writing is cr@ppy, because, if that's cr@p that Stephenie wrote, then I'm a f%&$(*# donkey!!!!
If you think Stephenie's first book was a piece of cr@p, then you have been reading the wrong books, because her books are f#%&*^@ AMAZING if you ask me. And I'll punch down anyone who says otherwise, because they are. For a young woman who had a baby on one knee and a toddler on the other while she typed. And very loud Blues Clues in the background. They are!
I'm sorry, but I hate it when I hear someone bashing a person with REAL talent. And I hope that, someday, I'm the one being asked to sign autographs and the books I've written, and that MY books will hit theaters and become a major film with people like Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart starring in them.

We've all got talent, and we ALL can become MAJOR authors, if we try hard enough!

Nat :angry:
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#18 jess_rob4ever

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 03:08 PM

*Shocked* You, know, I didn't really care for the last two books either, but do you have to.....even some of Meg's early work wasn't written very well. Stephenie's work was great!
What I'm saying is, how well do first time writers write? I've read a lot of authors first novels and thought they were CR@P. But when I looked back after reading their latest novels, I think they've really improved.
No author wants to hear this, but the first novel is ALWAYS the worst. Because they're written too quickly and excitedly, so none of the description and feel of what the character feels is on the page.
I'm a first time writer, and the first novel I wrote SU(KED! I mean, Writing like this for hours and hours and hours and long long hours.
I mean that writing this way is really anoying to the reader, so it just makes them put the book down and never pick it up ever again, ever.
You see?^
It used to be half page sentances. I really got tired, and embarrassed, when I reread my first novel. So Stephenie Meyer and Meg Cabot are pretty f^&%$* AMAZING! And I don't want to hear that their writing is cr@ppy, because, if that's cr@p that Stephenie wrote, then I'm a f%&$(*# donkey!!!!
If you think Stephenie's first book was a piece of cr@p, then you have been reading the wrong books, because her books are f#%&*^@ AMAZING if you ask me. And I'll punch down anyone who says otherwise, because they are. For a young woman who had a baby on one knee and a toddler on the other while she typed. And very loud Blues Clues in the background. They are!
I'm sorry, but I hate it when I hear someone bashing a person with REAL talent. And I hope that, someday, I'm the one being asked to sign autographs and the books I've written, and that MY books will hit theaters and become a major film with people like Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart starring in them.

We've all got talent, and we ALL can become MAJOR authors, if we try hard enough!

Nat :angry:


Actually, Stephenie Meyer's writing isn't very good. Her WORK, on the other hand, is absolutely addicting, but if you notice,
she overuses adjectives in one entence. She repeats words, and has plenty of grammar mistakes. Don't get me wrong,
I'm a HUGE Twihard. In fact, half of my room is filled with Twilight merchandise and I even skipped school one time
to go to a Hot Topic event for the Lost Concert. But let's face it, her writing is not her forte. It's her passion. Look at
the last book--did you notice how choppy the sentences were?

Don't get offended and defensive about it. You can still love books that aren't exactly literary works, which means you
love the characters or plot.

AND, it can be the editors' fault the writing is weak, because they let it get published in what could be assumed to be a
lazy moment instead of getting back to it and working and working on it. Still, no matter what, I'll still be a fan. You just
have to have a sense of reality, you know? How can you write when you don't see the truth?

About getting published as a teenager, you don't put your age in your query, so how can they know?
QUESTION: Are literary agents allowed to reject you simply because if your age? Even if they probably already
said they want to represent you?
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#19 BlackBerry321

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 03:35 PM

Nat: Here's the deal about Stephenie Meyer: her story is good - her book is bad. Those are two completely different things. I personally am not a great fan of the books but I think that the story - despite all it's flaws and "Edward Cullen is so perfect" - is relatively good. And she is by no means talented - she just had a good idea.

Anyway, that's another reason why most teenagers never get published: they hear something they don't like and they automatically go on the defensive "I'll punch people down" mode. The publishing industry is run by adults and they cannot stand working with whiny teens who refuse to listen to constructive critisism. So it's either grow up now or wait until you've got your temper under control before you send out your manuscript.

And please don't get ahead of yourself. First write that good book, find a publisher and once you've hit the bestseller list, you can think about the movie adaptations and Robert Pattinson.


Until then, I strongly suggest that you read Pat Walsh's 78 Reasons Why Your Book May Never Be Published and 14 Reasons Why It Just Might. It's gonna hurt but it's the really check that every teenager needs.


jess_rob4ever: Experienced agents usually always guess the approximate age of the writer when they read the query letters. That is, of course, unless the writer is so stupid that he or she actually writes "Oh, and by the way, I'm only a Freshman in so-and-so High School." Then they are bound to remember your name and will probably ignore all your following query letters for another twenty years.

If the teenage writer is amazingly talented, on the other hand, he or she can surely find a way to write a query letter so good that the agent - no matter how experienced - cannot guess their real age in a million light years. Now, if they decide to represent you because they though that the manuscript you sent them was so good, but then decide to drop you because of your age... it's by all means not illegal. It just shows that they are prejudiced against teenage writers. AND they also let an amazing opprtunity pass by.


If the writer has shown real maturity and the ability to handle the publishing world, then they should by all means go ahead and represent them. But there are, of course, those who reject amazing teenage manuscripts because they do not wish to work with whiny teens no matter how good their writing skills are. But chances are that they will contact you in ten years, if you haven't gotten published by then.

So to answer your question: yes, they can do it, but only if they feel that the writer is not yet ready for the Big Bad Publishing World. Trust me, I've met actual editors and publishers and their job is not easy. If the writer is being uncooperative, they can kiss their chances of ever getting published good-bye.

Hope that helps.

Peace out,
Penny

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#20 bleached_princess

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 03:56 PM

Penny, you wrock my world. Legit.

Now, I don't know how this turned into a discussion about Stefenie Meyer, because last time I checked, she was an adult, but, to be completely frank, she's not a good writer. She was a woman with a good story that people got addicted to. Now, in my singular opinion, I cannot stand the Twilight series. I can't. "Edward is so perfect!!!" got on my nerves, she wrote poorly, and vampires genreally creep me out. (even 'vegetarian' ones -- and that whole concept is completely wtf to me.) But I can see how people like her books. But you have to admit, they're not written well.

As for age ... yeah, there are some really fantastic teenage writers out there who write about things adullts and teenagers alike want to read. But we have to remember: what you write can't be fantstic for a teenager. It has to be fantastic in general, it has to be fantastic when compared to the work of adults that's being sent in. I'm not saying that it's not going to happen, because it obviously has, but it's less likely, especially when you have thousands of adult writers getting rejected. Let's face it: adults have more experience, they've been writing for a longer amount of time, they've had more time to hone their skill. A consolation is that when we're adults, we'll become those people. Just that's not happening now.

But not being able to write well because we don't have experience -- although I can see where she's coming from on that one, too, I have to disagree. I read once where someone was talking about writing romance when they'd never been kissed (somewhere on the nano forums ... if anyone can find the post I'll love you forever), and a poster who responded said that people say that virgins write the best erotica because they have more space to imagine the subject, and can't be bogged down by the flaws and realities that they know that occur. They then applied that to kissing ... which makes total sense, to me. But life experience is a big one. We're teenagers. We should go. Grow up. Have adventures. Make friends, meet people, fall in love. Then write about what happens. Not word-for-word, but a lot of writing is, subconsciously, based off yourself and your experiences. No, you don't have to do drugs to understand them, but we all know that person who's on drugs. Imagine writing a story about drugs at the age of twelve, when we barely knew what it was, had barely experienced people who were under the influence. I think that's the kind of experience de la Cruz is talking about, and I understand that completely.

Meanwhile, I'm going to keep writing. Why not? I write because I have a story to tell. I hope to hone my skill along the way, and with luck, get published as an adult.

Emmy :elmo: :badgrin:
he knows that chemistry is totally a triple-innuendo, right? "... I don't know, my bff jill?"
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#21 IlovePavlov13

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 09:59 PM

You know what I think, you should think your own writing is good, if anyone disagrees, then you shouldn't care because you're writing for yourself, and no one else.
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#22 jess_rob4ever

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 02:10 PM

You know what I think, you should think your own writing is good, if anyone disagrees, then you shouldn't care because you're writing for yourself, and no one else.


That's what I think.
But you should totally be open to CONSTRUCTIVE criticism.
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#23 Bookworm923

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Posted 06 April 2009 - 02:16 PM

I don't think you're gonna be making perfect stories when you first start writing, but I also think there are a lot of good teen writers out there, because they've had a little more practice.
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#24 themorninglight

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 08:26 PM

I'm fourteen and i have had three of my short stories publishes in literary magizines. She needs to shut the hell up. Most of us have expirenced our first kiss. If not, america's teenagers are so sexed-up that they have heard enough and read enough about it to describe a peck on the lips.
i do think that you need to practice everyday. I would not want to read a atory from someone who just started a week or a month or even a year. Their vocabulary needs to expand and they need more practice in description. The onlyreason i have so many things in magazines and was voted best writer in my school (We had a contest 50k words three months one hundred participants picked fro english teachers) and had me in the newspaper :) is because i started writing everday for two jours a day when i was nine. Thats half a decade! Oh and on the side note i saw on an authors website it said it takes an author ten years to become good!
Thats off topic but the point is that we can write and no one can stop us. Adults have the imagination drilled out of this with their momotious lives. If they think that you need to expirence somthing to write then stephanie meyer should live with vampires and been a survivor in a alien invasion, scott westerfield has been an ugly and expirenced the blue hour, jk rowling should be a magician. It all their incredible imaginations and that why they are house hold names. They held on to their creativitey.
We have more creativitey in our pinkey finger than their whole right side of the brain (controls vocabulary creativitey and reading or left i get confised) These agiest authors need to pull their panties out of a wad and give YA's a shot. We are the authors of the future and the present.
If i ever get published i will use my name to know that i am young and i can write! All of those who tole me who i couldnt do it would have to be taught a lesson that you cant judge a wuthor by their age.
(Wow! I'm the most passionate about this! The anger has aused adreanaline to start pumping through my veins so i am spazticallyt hyper right about now)
-Rachel
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#25 IluvWill22

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 10:08 PM

I'm sorry for my outburst.
I had already noticed the mistakes when I first read those books. I just never noticed the repeating words.
But I was really just angry because I saw her at the ComicCon and said that I wanted that to be me someday because (according to a few people) I have a relitively good idea. And that's my dream..But I really don't want to be a cr@ppy writer with a good idea...

Nat :(
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#26 CharliePantsxxx

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Posted 19 May 2009 - 11:29 PM

I can see Melissa De'la Cruz's (sorry if I got that name wrong) point. I can understand why she would not want to read a book about kissing by an inexperienced kisser - it would not be realistic, would it? And even in a book like Harry Potter, realism is important. And also, it is perfectly understandable for an adult not to want to read a book by a teenager full stop, even if they've kissed their lips away. This is because teenagers and adults have completely different lives, views, and ways of thinking - it is not plausible to expect a teenager or young person to be able to write about an adult in a realistic way. This is not to say the are not good writers - they could be freaking excellent! But still, as a teenager, I would say that it would be a better idea to write about teenagers. It doesn't matter if an adult doesn't want to read it, because if that teenager's work is good, then chances are their book/novella/poem/whatever will still have readers... just readers more their own age.

So, in conclusion: Melissa should give a teenage romance a try. But if she doesn't like it, she can put it down. And, apart from in pretty exceptional circumstances, kids can't write a realistic novels about adults, or for adults.

That's what I think.

xox
char
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#27 IluvWill22

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 01:34 PM

And most adults can't write realistic novels about teens. We both see different things because we have different points of view.
I mean, how many of us can relate to Bella Swan? Or Em Watts (I'm just throwing names out there, don't kill me guys, I find some of these books to be amazing!)? Or Stephenie...um..(It's been a year since I've read How to be Popular...)
Can we really relate? Because they all act a lot like adults.
I can understand if Melissa doesn't want to read a book about an adult done by a teen, but when adults write about teens, they should mature it down a bit, because we are not like that.

I decided a long time ago to cut out most adult scenes in my book. (I had a few scenes where the MCs were adults. But I couldn't make it mature enough...)
I'm scared of what any of my favorite authors would say (when or if) they read my novel. Melissa would probably stick her nose up in the air and say that I didn't have enough experiance, therefor, it sucked.
Or maybe if Meg got bored at the bookstore and picked it up! Or Stephenie!
It's a stupid fear, to pick up a newspaper and see a headline that says "15 year old writes terrible book with an okay plot. Proof that teens shouldn't be allowed to publish.." And it's your book they're talking about.
(Which would be ironic, because my art teacher had us make our own newspapers, and one of my headlines said that my book was the new Twilight. As well as the main headline being that the war ended...)

Nat :(
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#28 CharliePantsxxx

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Posted 20 May 2009 - 09:07 PM

And most adults can't write realistic novels about teens. We both see different things because we have different points of view.
I mean, how many of us can relate to Bella Swan? Or Em Watts (I'm just throwing names out there, don't kill me guys, I find some of these books to be amazing!)? Or Stephenie...um..(It's been a year since I've read How to be Popular...)
Can we really relate? Because they all act a lot like adults.
I can understand if Melissa doesn't want to read a book about an adult done by a teen, but when adults write about teens, they should mature it down a bit, because we are not like that.

Nat :(


I dunno about that. I think Steph was really immature, and thought about things that teenagers think about, in a way that made the story funny and interesting. Bella's boring (in my opinion), but that doesn't make her mature. And Em Watts is quite tough and, I guess, mature, but not in a way that an adult is.

Well, that's my opinion.

Lol, I am so sorry if I sounded rude or defensive :P

Melissa would probably stick her nose up in the air and say that I didn't have enough experiance, therefor, it sucked.


Well, I think that Melissa was saying that she wouldn't want to read a kissing scene that was written by a person that had never been kissed, because it wouldn't be realistic. That's different from saying that all inexperienced writers' work sucks.

xox

char
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#29 CrazyCheerChick

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Posted 16 July 2009 - 06:19 PM

Well ... that's mean of her :-P Has anyone ever told her that her books aren't that good either? I mean, yes. Revelations was okay. But the rest of the books in that series were utterly horrible. So boring! She's not pretty either xP

It's true that older people are usually better writers, but it's stereotypical to say that all young writers are bad. I've read fan fictions written by the under-18 crowd that were better than some books I've read by adults (and I've read a lot of books).
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#30 Bella Catarina

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Posted 17 July 2009 - 03:36 PM

That's what I think.
But you should totally be open to CONSTRUCTIVE criticism.

I don't quite agree with that. Sure, constructive criticism is great when you ask for it and can accept it, but it also makes many of us defensive (including me). It can be a good thing, but it depends on the demeanor of both parties. If you can't accept it graciously, I think it's best to wait.

Well ... that's mean of her :-P Has anyone ever told her that her books aren't that good either? I mean, yes. Revelations was okay. But the rest of the books in that series were utterly horrible. So boring! She's not pretty either xP

It's true that older people are usually better writers, but it's stereotypical to say that all young writers are bad. I've read fan fictions written by the under-18 crowd that were better than some books I've read by adults (and I've read a lot of books).

Your opinion of her writing doesn't bother me so much, but what you have said about her appearance really bugs me. Firstly, I don't see how it's relevant, and secondly, you act like it's some huge factor in her character.


-

I personally think that her opinion is her opinion. You don't have to listen to it if you don't want to. She isn't God. Try not to let it bug you too much- I tend to let things bug me and all it does is depress me.

The quote in full is as follows:

So many people want to WRITE but they have not yet even begun to LIVE. I think that the reason so many of us YA writers are in our 30s is because at this age, we finally can see clearly, what being a teenager really meant. When you are too close to the experience, you don’t have the objective distance with which to write about it. I can’t wait to be 50 and write about a young mother in her 30s.

Also, a lot of the fun in my books is inspired by the REAL fun I had going to clubs, covering fashion shows, trying to get into all those crazy parties, dancing on tables with my friends, indulging in a lot of boyfriend/girlfriend drama. I went out there and experienced life. I recently read about a young writer who had published her first novel (a teen romance) and she said she had never even been kissed! How can you write about boys if you don’t know what they are like? If you have never even had a boyfriend? I was quite appalled. I don’t want to read a romance from someone who has never experienced love. Puh-leeze.

So, get out there. Kiss tons of boys. Fight with your girlfriends. Go to a lot of parties. Spend too much money. Have FUN. Fall in love. Fall out of love. Make mistakes. Wear platform shoes and trip on them.

Then, a few years later, write about it. You have all the time in the world to be a writer, but you are only young and can fit into that size 2 Betsey Johnson silver micro-mini skirt once. (Ah, I remember that skirt very fondly. It came up to my upper thigh, barely covering my butt, and it got me in a lot of trouble with many cute boys.)

http://melissa-delac...hp/info/advice/



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#31 jess_rob4ever

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Posted 28 July 2009 - 10:05 PM

I don't know about it anymore because, recently, I enterred an English 101 college class
late June and I'm the youngest one there. I'm 15 and everyone else is twenty and over, even forty.

Yet, when my professor was taking conferences with everyone about their research paper and she asked
me if I was worried about anything, I said I was worried because this was my first research paper and that
I was only fifteen, so much younger than everyone else.

Guess what? She looked so shocked. "You're 15?!" Then, she told me I was the best writer in the class.

I have the comment paper she wrote it on again tucked into my wallet so I can carry it everywhere. Such an
ego boost. And I'd read some other people's papers and, really, some weren't good.

You see, AGE DOES NOT MATTER.

PS. I go to a middle college so I started high school the same time as college.
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#32 thehealthyalternative

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 10:34 AM

I honestly don't think age matters. There have been many teenage writers who went on to become best sellers (the guy who wrote Eragon nonwithstanding, because his parents owned the publishing company or something which published him, so I smell a bit of nepotism). Frankenstein was written by a teenager. The Outsiders. Those are just two examples. I think that age shouldn't even matter. If a teenager can write a book that will blow the socks off people their own age AND adults alike, then good for them! They deserve that!

But the truth is, not many teenagers have that skill level... YET. It takes practice, just as it does with anything else.

And the whole thing about not having experience hindering your writing ability is a bunch of bull in my opinion. For example, in one of my stories, there are two main characters who are gay guys. I have no experience with the details of a gay relationship, but that's what the world of imagination is for, and then after that, constructive criticism. I give the chapters that I need help on to my friend S (who is a gay guy) and he helps me out there. It's the same for any sort of scenario where the writer may not be experienced. Like another example is Jodi Picoult, who wrote My Sister's Keeper. She recently wrote a book called Nineteen Minutes that is about a school shooting. To write a book like that there are obviously going to be a lot of technical details that she wouldn't know about. She had to employ the help of cops, doctors, etc., to make sure she got the details right. I don't see why people have such a problem with that.

If you're inexperienced at something but you genuinely want to write about it, get help with it, then! It'll benefit you so much! You shouldn't think you have to stay away from a certain subject just because you have no experience. You've never been kissed but want to write a kissing scene? Do it! You've seen enough movies, you've probably heard your friends talking, and I'm sure you've imagined your first kiss in your head before, so you should be able to write it just fine! If you're not sure about it, get a trusted friend to help you out!

But don't get defensive about things, people. Age shouldn't matter when you're writing. You're probably not going to be at your best when you're younger, because you haven't been writing as long as most adults have. But you should be willing to take the constructive criticism and work every chance you can get to improve yourself and your writing instead of getting defensive and pulling the age card left and right.

Hope that all made sense [x

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#33 jess_rob4ever

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Posted 29 July 2009 - 05:57 PM

I honestly don't think age matters. There have been many teenage writers who went on to become best sellers (the guy who wrote Eragon nonwithstanding, because his parents owned the publishing company or something which published him, so I smell a bit of nepotism). Frankenstein was written by a teenager. The Outsiders. Those are just two examples. I think that age shouldn't even matter. If a teenager can write a book that will blow the socks off people their own age AND adults alike, then good for them! They deserve that!

But the truth is, not many teenagers have that skill level... YET. It takes practice, just as it does with anything else.

And the whole thing about not having experience hindering your writing ability is a bunch of bull in my opinion. For example, in one of my stories, there are two main characters who are gay guys. I have no experience with the details of a gay relationship, but that's what the world of imagination is for, and then after that, constructive criticism. I give the chapters that I need help on to my friend S (who is a gay guy) and he helps me out there. It's the same for any sort of scenario where the writer may not be experienced. Like another example is Jodi Picoult, who wrote My Sister's Keeper. She recently wrote a book called Nineteen Minutes that is about a school shooting. To write a book like that there are obviously going to be a lot of technical details that she wouldn't know about. She had to employ the help of cops, doctors, etc., to make sure she got the details right. I don't see why people have such a problem with that.

If you're inexperienced at something but you genuinely want to write about it, get help with it, then! It'll benefit you so much! You shouldn't think you have to stay away from a certain subject just because you have no experience. You've never been kissed but want to write a kissing scene? Do it! You've seen enough movies, you've probably heard your friends talking, and I'm sure you've imagined your first kiss in your head before, so you should be able to write it just fine! If you're not sure about it, get a trusted friend to help you out!

But don't get defensive about things, people. Age shouldn't matter when you're writing. You're probably not going to be at your best when you're younger, because you haven't been writing as long as most adults have. But you should be willing to take the constructive criticism and work every chance you can get to improve yourself and your writing instead of getting defensive and pulling the age card left and right.

Hope that all made sense [x

Pet/ra


I completely agree about the experience thing.

I mean, there are actors out there that are portraying heart-stopping romances, but soome have admitted they've
never even been in love before.
And if you're writing about a werewold, I guess that blows it out of the water, right?
I mean, first you have to BECOME one to know the experiences. Psh.
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#34 Avalon-Princess

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Posted 30 July 2009 - 04:20 PM

Okay, so I can see why Melissa De La Cruz would say that. And maybe age shouldn't matter, but sometimes it does. When it comes down to it, a lot of things that shouldn't matter do, like your gender. But you know, just because one author said that she wouldn't read something like that doesn't mean that someone else wouldn't. I personally don't think that age matter, and really, experience doesn't matter all that much either. Have I ever gotten into a physical fight? No, but I've been told that I write them pretty good. I think that writing takes a lot of imagination, and SKILL. If you don't have those two, then you're gonna be in trouble. And I know that I am not the best writer out there, not even close, nor do I pretend to be. But I guess what I'm saying is that I don't think your age matters at all.
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#35 iLoveXFactor

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Posted 31 July 2009 - 02:46 AM

I don't think age matters. You can be thirteen and write amazingly and you just get better all the time. I see so maany people here write better as they go along. And with the experience thing, you don't NEED experience in life because you can read so many other stories with the same genre as yours. However, with one of my particular stories I have going right now, I think a fair bit of experience - or a LOT of experience is required. I'm writing about my nan and her dementia. Now obviously someone who knows about the condition, its effects, and who has seen it progress can only write it accurately, but if it's something like romance, then you don't necessarily need it. Back to the age thing, I don't think there is a certain age. You write what you like, end of. Sorry if this doesn't even make any sense whatsoever.
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#36 jess_rob4ever

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Posted 02 August 2009 - 04:43 PM

I don't think age matters. You can be thirteen and write amazingly and you just get better all the time. I see so maany people here write better as they go along. And with the experience thing, you don't NEED experience in life because you can read so many other stories with the same genre as yours. However, with one of my particular stories I have going right now, I think a fair bit of experience - or a LOT of experience is required. I'm writing about my nan and her dementia. Now obviously someone who knows about the condition, its effects, and who has seen it progress can only write it accurately, but if it's something like romance, then you don't necessarily need it. Back to the age thing, I don't think there is a certain age. You write what you like, end of. Sorry if this doesn't even make any sense whatsoever.


You make sense.

It's like with my parents: they have a TON of experience--even near-death experiences!--but when they make up stories, guess what? They're not exactly the most interesting.
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#37 xxToxic_lovexx

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 01:20 PM

doesn't matter all that much either. Have I ever gotten into a physical fight? No, but I've been told that I write them pretty good. .

Pretty Well. Sorry, that was bugging me.

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#38 Bookworm923

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 01:29 PM

I don't think Melissa de la Cruz meant to seem offensive, I just think that she meant that there are some things you have to know about to write. I mean, you can say something happened in the story and it make since, but you can't really describe it without experiencing it.
-Kayli ;p
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#39 xxToxic_lovexx

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 01:32 PM

I can understand her opinion. Her opinion. That doesn't make her correct or incorrect. It is just saying that she is ruthfully ignorant. Some teenagers are amazing writers (the prophecy of the stones! FRANKINSTEIN! The outsiders!) so in that sense, she is voicing her opinion. While i think those books are better than most ones adults have written about teenagers, she may think otherwise. Stephenie Meyer couldn't quite capture the teenager persona nor any other adult author i have read writing in a teenagers point of veiw. Maia is a little more mature but much more but thats her personality! Most writers even when writing about immature teens, that just cannot do it. meg is the only one that has come close enough to the teenage persona to make it actually relatable. But that is just my opinion.

Themorninglight- yes, J.k rowling books are very unrealistic. But, the parts that could be real are very realistic. The teen fights, crushes, and drama fits correctly in todays society perfectly.
I understand that part of melissa opinion. The parts of the books that are realistic need to be realistic, and the only way to get them that way is experiance and practice. You can't describe pain correctly if you have never expirenced pain. You cant describe love if you have never expirenced love. It just doesn't work that way. The people that have expirenced love cannot relate because it is not like the way you described it.

So, in a way, I can see her point.

But whoever said that her books were horrible, that is being slgihtly ignorant. yes, that is your opinion and yes i have read those books and noticed the errors too, but she was good enough to get published. And, she probably doesnt even care about our opinions on account we just earned her money by buying her books.

No one is right or wrong. It is a matter of opinion.

Lilly.
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#40 Bookworm923

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Posted 03 August 2009 - 03:23 PM

Has anybody actually read the whole quote? Because a lot of what she's saying seems to be over exaggerated on this thread. Actually read the whole quote if you haven't here.
http://melissa-delac...hp/info/advice/
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#41 PurpleBelly.

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 11:35 AM

I don't think it should matter, as long as you write maturely and you're what the publisher is looking for. ^_^


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#42 thehealthyalternative

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Posted 10 August 2009 - 12:18 PM

^ I agree. But really, you shouldn't even put your age down when you write a query letter to an agent or a publisher. Let your writing speak for itself. If it's good enough to them, they will think so, whether you're 15 or 50.

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#43 Avalon-Princess

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Posted 12 August 2009 - 03:57 PM

Pretty Well. Sorry, that was bugging me.

Lilly

Haha sorry. It's okay
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#44 *megan*

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Posted 13 August 2009 - 10:26 AM

this is a really interesting topic for me. i'm 21, and i've been writing stories since i was 5 years old (my very first - The Boat and Jimmy... those were the days!!) and I've been a member of this WF since.... 2004? so, as scary as this is for me to admit, i know qualify as an "adult writer", even though i might still think of myself as teenage.

i'm going to quote myself here, because this debate has reminded me of it. this is something i wrote in my one of my story threads (Letters to Mattie, if you're interested). I think it is relevant here:

QUOTE (*megan* @ Jun 24 2009, 02:20 PM)
when i was younger, my writing was good but it was just too YOUNG. i needed to grow up for my content to be good.



While I'm rambling, I'll highlight this^^^. This is the biggest problem with people's writing on MCBC. It's important to accept that, for most writers, you have to mature before your writing does. It takes time and you have to wait. Some writers try and push it too young. Like, talking about publishers when you're fifteen. Give it time. When you're 30, you'll be glad you did. Imagine if by some chance you did get published at 15. When you get older, you'll be embarrassed (in an affectionate way) of the things you wrote when you were this age. That's just the way writing works.


Someone mentioned earlier the difference between fantastic writing and fantastic writing for a teenager. This is such an important distinction. It is not enough to write well for your age group. The writing has to be good, simply, pure and simple.

I actually agree with Melissa D'Cruz on this. I think she's made several intelligent points. Distance and objectivity are everything for writers.

And talking about fantasy writers is completely different. A person writing a vampire story is different than a 13 year old talking about sex. The truth is there really are some things you have to experience before you can give them justice by writing about them. Love and sex fall under that category.

Don't be discouraged. It is worth the wait.

When you are older and published for real, you will be very, very glad you did.
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#45 princessesrox123

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 01:26 PM

Well I think Melissa maybe just meant that how could a girl who'd never been kissed write a love-making scene or something.

She just thinks you need to experience something to write as good as possible.

To me though, age really doesn't matter. I really can't tell from a story how old the author is. Sometimes the author is much older or much younger than you expected. Another thing is also that when you are reading things by authors from like the 1800s, sometimes you even forget the authors are from a different time period. As long as you don't know the age of the author, you can judge more freely on the writing.

Bottom line: Age and books are two different things. If you're twelve and you can write with as much maturity as you were thirty then go ahead! There is nothing there to stop you.

-Nikki :icon_sunny:

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