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How the Publishing Industry Works


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#1 *HONEY*

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 08:02 PM

Edited:

Check this out: http://www.ian-irvine.com/

Sidebar: The Truth About Publishing

Learn it. Know it.
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#2 poohtickle123456

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Posted 28 March 2008 - 09:02 PM

Hey Tephy,

Thanks sooo much for posting this. I wanted the exact questions answered but didn't know where to go. Thank you!!

Danielle
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#3 *HONEY*

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Posted 29 March 2008 - 02:02 PM

Haha no problem :)

Sarah, did you sticky this? That's so cool!
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#4 ~booknerd~

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Posted 29 March 2008 - 03:06 PM

Haha, nice. How Publishing Works for Dummies. I found it very informative. Thanks, Tephy!

Emily :icon_flower:

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#5 schrodingers cat

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Posted 29 March 2008 - 07:30 PM

Sarah, did you sticky this? That's so cool!


I thought that it deserved to be stickied.

Soon we shall have more stickied topics than unstickied. :icon_redface: ^_^
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#6 Jesse'sQuerida

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Posted 29 March 2008 - 08:06 PM

Thank you so much for that post!
It really helps with everything.
I guess i'll have to be patient.
*darn*
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#7 ssharin7

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 11:56 AM

This is giving me second doubts about publishing :unsure:

I mean I thought it went like this: send your story to a publish company they reject you or want you. Pay 500 dollars for them to do all the shee-bam, yo are published ta dah!

but apparently, it's not :mellow:

Fudge.

Sara :]
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#8 CharliePantsxxx

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Posted 25 May 2008 - 08:21 AM

Oh my gosh, I didn't know that if your book didn't sell a publisher could stop publishing your book!!

Oh no!!

I'm really going to have to try hard.

Also, that thing that was said about making your story interesting from the first line helps. Unfortunatley my book is only interesting from the first chapter... :blush: I'm evil.

Lolz

Char
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#9 SharpofWit

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Posted 10 December 2008 - 08:15 PM

Haha I realize this is an old post but I just found it and it's EXTREMELY helpful. Kind of scary, yeah, but absolutely neccessary. Being an author is hard.
Haha we couldn't pick an easy career, huh?
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#10 w/peaches

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Posted 01 February 2009 - 10:01 AM

I didn't read all of it but what I did read actually seemed kind of discouraging! I know being a writer is really tough, but still... That was...discouraging.
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#11 Hanie1991

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Posted 06 February 2011 - 06:19 PM

wow publishing really works like this ? damn . thanks so much for the info . now i know what to do when i want to be like meg cabot . ehehehehe :)
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#12 Logan1949

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Posted 24 April 2011 - 12:33 AM

Almost everything he said about the publishing industry is true except for his comment in "Lesson 10B: Putting your money where your manuscript is ... publishing it yourself ... This isn't easy, and it definitely isn't cheap," This is no longer true, at least for paperback publishing.

You can publish your own book through Createspace (a subsidiary of Amazon.com) for less than $50 (includes a $39 pro-plan fee), if you only order one proof copy. This assumes you let Createspace buy the ISBN number. If you buy your own ISBNs ($50-$100 each) then you can turn off the title in Creatspace and publish the title with another publisher using the same ISBN. I believe using Lightning Source as a printer/publisher is similarly inexpensive, where a company like Lulu will charge several hundred dollars and require a minimum order of 25 copies.

I use Createspace and usually end up going through a cycle of changing the manuscript or cover through about 6-8 proof copies at less than $10 each (about $8.95 including shipping).

After I approve the book for distribution to different channels (Createspace, Amazon.com and/or commercial distribution) Createspace will let you build a web page for sales through their site (they will take 20% of the retail price) and they will automatically add it to Amazon.com (which will take 40% of the retail price) and if you have allowed it, they will send it out to commercial distribution (which will take something like 55-60% of the retail price.)

Also, anything added to Createspace and Amazon.com gets picked up by other enterprising web booksellers like Barnesandnoble.com or the occasional web site in India or New Zealand or Australia, or the U.K. All at no cost to the author. Just this week, Amazon.com ported their inventory of books over to Amazon.de in Germany. It was a real kick to see my english-language book being "advertised" (made available) in German on Amazon.de.

Createspace (and Lightning Source?) are Print-on-Demand printers. They have a huge machine which binds books as few as one at a time. So, there is no major expense to the author by requiring a run of 500 or 10,000 copies. There is no warehousing expense to the author or publisher. I don't know how the commercial distribution is handled (Createspace reserves the right to do a print run of thousands, for fast-selling titles), but for every book sold online to the author there is only the basic printing cost (.85 + 300 pages * .012 = $4.45 for a novel), plus shipping (about 3.80 for one copy, or 8.95 for 10 copies). Books sold to buyers other than the author are sold at the set retail price plus shipping.

If you had a hundred dollars and wanted to print ten copies of your book to give to friends and family, you could do it. However, if you are publishing something to be sold to the public, I highly recommend hiring an editor to clean up the manuscript, and a book designer to do the layout and cover, and a marketing agent or agency. Anyone can push a book out to Amazon.com, but whether or not many people buy it will depend on word-of-mouth advertising. More than a few errors and your book will generate negative feedback that will make it hard for you to sell not only that book, but future books.

He is totally correct in saying that the vast majority of writers will not only not get rich by writing, but most of them will not even make a good living at it. I have spent most of my spare time (I have a day-job) in the last week editing a picture book. I now understand why every writer would like to have a publisher behind them to do the editing and proofreading, and designing, and marketing. Yes, you can get your book into print cheaply and by yourself, but someone has to do the editing and proofreading and designing and marketing. What would you rather do, write, or spend all your time doing all the other things that need doing to bring your book before the public so it will sell well?

One advantage of self-publishing, is that you can make your work available in print form. If your book sells thousands of copies, a publisher may be more willing to risk money on your subsequent book(s). One disadvantage of self-publishing is that no publisher will want to sell that title, and if it does not sell well to the public, it will inhibit publishers from wanting to risk money on your subsequent books.

Write well,
Logan
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#13 LadyBeetle345

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 09:04 PM

Final lesson: Anyone who can be discouraged from writing should be

If all this is so disheartening that you plan to give up, you probably weren't meant to be a writer - you just don't want it enough. However, if it's only made you all the more determined, you've got a good chance of making it, for it's the writers who refuse to give up their dream that succeed. I hope you do - the literary world needs more people like you. Just remember that whenever you sit down to write, you're competing with every other writer in the world, in your genre. And when you get there, treat it as a great adventure for as long as it lasts. Don't bet your life on it, for what goes up almost always comes down again. Good luck!

I liked this tip, because it makes so much sense. People who are so discouraged, maybe they just weren't meant to write. They just don't want it as bad.

April :fish:

Edited by LadyBeetle345, 30 April 2011 - 09:05 PM.

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#14 ecraven

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 10:23 PM

But you guys should also remember that publishers can't publish everyone which is why e-publishing is so good :) And you can make more money from it... there's a great blog for that called ebook revolution, I'd check it out.
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